TAKE ACTION NOW

THERE ARE MANY WAYS YOU CAN HELP END THE THREATS TO ASIAN ELEPHANTS:

EMAIL PRIME MINISTER THERESA MAY

EMAIL DR MAHESH SHARMA,
INDIA’S MINISTER OF TOURISM

EMAIL MR NAVTEJ SARNA, HIGH COMMISSIONER OF INDIA IN LONDON

DONATE

Here’s an example of an email you could send, but feel free to personalise yours:

Dear Prime Minister

I am delighted that the Conservative Manifesto pledges to “support the Indian Government in its efforts to protect the Asian elephant”. Captive elephants in India are often trained and controlled by the use of pain and fear. The animals experience great suffering.

I believe elephant tourist attractions must be converted into genuine sanctuaries where elephants are free to express their natural behaviour and can be viewed from respectful distances by tourists. I urge the UK to help the Indian Government with the funding of such sanctuaries.

Wild elephants in India suffer from poaching and loss of habitat. I hope the UK will help India to develop further ‘corridors’ which enable elephants to move safely between their fragmented forest habitats.

I support the work of Save The Asian Elephants (STAE). STAE will keep the British people closely informed of the Government’s progress in fulfilling its promise to support India.

Yours faithfully

EMAIL PRIME MINISTER THERESA MAY

Dr Mahesh Sharma is India’s Minister of Tourism. Ask his country to do more to protect its elephants, both wild and captive; and ask him to stop the horrific practice of Pajan. Complete the following boxes and press SEND to email Dr Sharma.

Your Name

Your Email Address

Your message


SEE EXAMPLE EMAIL HERE

As High Commissioner, it is Navtej Sarna’s role to take the concerns of the UK public back to the Indian government. Ask his country to do more to protect its elephants, both wild and captive; and ask him to stop the horrific practice of pajan. Complete the following boxes and press SEND to email Mr Navtej Sarna.

Your Name

Your Email Address

Your message


SEE EXAMPLE EMAIL HERE

Please help us give the elephants a chance, while there’s still time. With more funds we could do much more to protect these cruelly treated, endangered creatures

Your gift will help us to:

  • Press tourism operators worldwide to remove elephant attractions (e.g. those offering rides or where elephants perform tricks) from their itinerary and replace them with visits to genuine sanctuaries and wildlife reserves.
  • Lobby politicians in Westminster and Europe to press the Governments of India and other Asian countries with elephant populations to end the abuse of captive elephants and to do much more to protect wild elephants.
  • Work with the authorities in India and other Asian countries to tackle these problems.


Dear Minister,

I am deeply concerned about the plight of the Asian elephant in India, both in the wild and in captivity. I am therefore writing to ask the Indian government to do more to protect them in the wild; to enforce and strengthen the legal guidelines for the management of captive elephants; and to outlaw the use of pajan as a method of domestication.

Whilst elephants have been deeply embedded in Indian culture for centuries, the use of the pajan to domesticate them must surely come to an end. UK tourists are becoming increasingly aware that to train elephants for the tourist industry and at religious functions, the vast majority of elephants are trained using this horrific ritual. Young elephants are immobilized and subject to intense beatings and deprivations to subdue their ‘wild spirit’ and make them docile for training. It can be seen at www.stae.org/horrors.

Moreover, humans now know far more than before about the great intelligence, emotional sensitivity and rich social lives of the world’s largest land mammal. To keep them routinely hobbled and chained for long periods in isolation, suffering foot diseases, heat stress and intense psychological distress, are practices that cannot be justified in the eyes of the world.

The British Government’s Manifesto pledges to “support the Indian Government in its efforts to protect the Asian elephants”. We urge the Indian Government to work closely with the British Government and Save The Asian Elephants (STAE) to protect this ancient species.

Yours faithfully

Your Excellency,

I am deeply concerned about the plight of the Asian elephant in India, both in the wild and in captivity. I am therefore writing to ask the Indian government to do more to protect them in the wild; to enforce and strengthen the legal guidelines for the management of captive elephants; and to outlaw the use of pajan as a method of domestication.

Whilst elephants have been deeply embedded in Indian culture for centuries, the use of the pajan to domesticate them must surely come to an end. UK tourists are becoming increasingly aware that to train elephants for the tourist industry and religious functions, the majority of elephants are trained using this horrific ritual. Young elephants are immobilized and subject to intense beatings and deprivations to subdue their ‘wild spirit’ and make them docile for training. It can be seen at www.stae.org/horrors.

Moreover, humans now know far more than before about the great intelligence, emotional sensitivity and rich social lives of the world’s largest land mammal. To keep them routinely hobbled and chained for long periods in isolation, suffering foot diseases, heat stress and intense psychological distress, are practices that cannot be justified in the eyes of the world.

The British Government’s Manifesto pledges to “support the Indian Government in its efforts to protect the Asian elephants”. We urge the Indian Government to work closely with the British Government and Save The Asian Elephants (STAE) to protect this ancient species.

Yours faithfully

TOURIST DESTINATIONS

Tour companies listen to their customers and by letting them know you want to see elephants only as nature intended you send a powerful message.

If you’re visiting India, Thailand or other Asian countries, don’t attend attractions that offer elephant rides or that force these magnificent animals to perform tricks – and tell your tour operator why.

Many of these places call themselves “sanctuaries”, “orphanages” or “eco-tourist camps” but there are no laws governing the use of these descriptions and few have genuinely rescued elephants or provide conditions that can be described as respite. Only go to genuine sanctuaries [see note below] or to places where you can watch elephants in the wild.

TOUR OPERATORS

Many tour operators offer elephant attractions. With your help, we’ll urge tour operators who include such visits in their itinerary to drop elephant attractions from their programmes. Thanks to public pressure some have already done so.

We ask you to email tour operators who still include these attractions in their holiday offerings.

Click here to sign our petition

MPs

Through their diplomatic contacts with India and South East Asian countries, the UK government can influence change.

110 UK MPs signed a House of Commons motion (Early Day Motion 436 of 2014) on Asian elephants in the Parliamentary session that finished in March 2015. This link lists all the MPs who have signed the motion.

Please urge your MP to sign a new House of Commons motion (Early Day Motion 45 of 2015) tabled by STAE’s Virendra Sharma MP urging the UK Government to act upon its recent election pledge to take steps to protect Asian elephants. This link will show whether your MP has already signed: www.parliament.uk/edm/2015-16/45. Please thank your MP if he/she has already signed (find your MP at www.parliament.uk).

INDIAN PRIME MINISTER AND INDIAN HIGH COMMISSIONER IN LONDON

Please write to these key figures. In your letter you could make any of the following points:

  • The survival and welfare of elephants in India is under serious threat
  • Urge India to intensify its efforts to end the capture of elephants from the wild. Explain that you know this is illegal under Indian law but despite this it continues on a significant scale.
  • Please urgently end Pajan – the brutal process of ‘taming’ wild elephants designed to break their spirit. Point out that this is damaging India’s good name
  • Welfare standards for captive elephants used in tourist attractions, temples, processions and festivals are generally poor – most elephants are kept in isolation with inadequate food, water and shelter. Explain that you know that guidelines for the management of elephants have been in place since 2008 but stress that these are rarely observed in practice and also need to be strengthened
  • Urge India to redouble its efforts to address the problems of human – elephant conflict.
  • Say you support Save the Asian Elephants and ask them to collaborate with STAE

The address for the Indian Prime Minister is:

Mr Narendra Modi
Prime Minister of India
South Block
Raisina Hill
New Delhi – 110011
India
(no email address available. Other contact methods are on pmindia.gov.in)

The address for the Indian High Commissioner is:

His Excellency Mr Navtej Sarna
High Commissioner of India
High Commission of India
India House
Aldwych
London
WC2B 4NA
And by email: info.london@hcilondon.in

Representative offices in London of other South East Asian governments with surviving wild Asian elephants to whom we also ask you to write are:

Royal Thai Embassy
29-30 Queen’s Gate
London, SW7 5JB
Tel: 0207 589 2944
csinfo@thaiembassyuk.org.uk

High Commission of Sri Lanka
13 Hyde Park Gardens
London W2 2LU
Tel: 020 7262 1841
mail@slhc-london.co.uk

Embassy of Nepal
12A Kensington Palace Gardens
London W8 4QU
info@nepembassy.org.uk
eon@nepembassy.org.uk

Embassy of Vietnam
12-14 Victoria Road
London W8 5RD
Tel: 020 7937 1912
consular@vietnamembassy.org.uk

Embassy of Myanmar
19a Charles street
London
WIJ 1DX
0207 148 0740
ambassadoroffice@myanmarembassylondon.com

High Commission of Malaysia
45-46 Belgrave Square
London SW1X 8QT
mwlondon@kln.gov.my

Embassy of the Republic of Indonesia
38 Grosvenor Square
London,W1K 2HW
kbri@btconnect.com

High Commission for Bangladesh
28 Queens Gate
London SW7 5JA
hc@bhclondon.org.uk

Embassy of Bhutan
2,Windacres, Warren Road
Guildford GU1 3HG
United Kingdom
mrutland@aol.com

Embassy of the Lao People’s Democratic Republic
Asia House
63 New Cavendish Street
London W1G 7LP
enquiries@asiahouse.co.uk

Royal Embassy of Cambodia
64 Brondesbury Park
Willesden Green
London NW6 7AT
cambodianembassy@btconnect.com

Embassy of the People’s Republic of China
51 Portland Place
London W1B 1JL
political@chinese-embassy.org.uk

GENUINE SANCTUARIES

Genuine sanctuaries are those where elephants:

  • Are rescued from existing service; not bred for tourism or captured from the wild
  • Are free to roam and interact socially and are not chained or abused
  • Do not have to give rides or perform tricks
  • Enjoy respectful and caring relationships with their mahouts, who are in turn adequately paid and supported
  • Have access to professional veterinary care
  • Are allowed to be elephants.

If a sanctuary permits visitors to feed or bathe elephants, suitable foodstuffs and clean appropriate waters must be provided; the animals must not be bathed for excessive periods merely to satisfy tourists.

We hope over time to build and publicise a list of good and respectable sanctuaries to assist you in choosing your holiday destination. Meanwhile do provide us with your feedback on any such places you visit

Start typing and press Enter to search